Females in Fiction // my favorite quotes!

The female characters I love the most in fiction are a mix of the very fiesty, the very cunning or smart, and the very brave. I grew up devouring books whenever I could, and in books I found dozens of amazing female characters that felt not only like role models but like friends. I grew up admiring them and wanting to emulate them, and obviously, this all had a lot to do with how they acted and, most important, what they said. Here are some of my favorite characters in fiction ever and the quotes that made me fall in love with them. (In no particular order!)

Scarlett O’Hara

I LOVE Scarlett O’Hara despite all of her immense faults because in the face of adversity, Scarlett does anything but give up. She is constantly fighting to keep her family together, keep her house, and stay alive.

“I’ll think of it tomorrow, at Tara. I can stand it then. Tomorrow, I’ll think of some way to get him back. After all, tomorrow is another day.”

Elizabeth Bennet

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Book rec // ‘The Last Days of Night’ review

Raaave review coming! If you’re into historical fiction like me (I would say I’m more obsessed), then I would absolutely recommend a new release called The Last Days of Night by Graham Moore. Set in the late 19th century, The Last Days of Night really intrigued me because it promised a fictional account of a subject I didn’t know so much about: the legal and dramatic battle between George Westinghouse and Thomas Edison to answer one very important question: Who invented the light bulb?

the last days of nightIn school, we learn that Thomas Edison invented the light bulb, but the truth is actually muddled, confusing, and varied. The narrative of this book is from the perspective of a man named Paul Cravath, a Tennessee-born New York lawyer who, at 27, is a precocious partner in a law firm with a lot to prove. He’s approached by George Westinghouse—and threatened by Thomas Edison—to lead a countersuit against Edison for the right to manufacture the incandescent light bulb.

Sounds dry, but within the historical narrative is intertwined drama, attempted murder, glitzy New York parties, THE Nikola Tesla, and a snapshot of New York during the Gilded Age. I ADORE New York fiction because I grew up here in the ‘burbs (and attended college in Manhattan and the Bronx) and so New York was always my playground, and I absolutely love reading about the history of what I consider “my city.”
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Book rec // ‘Overlapping Lives’

I picked up Overlapping Lives, by Andrew Dicker, on a whim. I was looking for a quick read, something not too long or difficult, and what I found instead was an unconventional group of stories that really challenged and excited me. I would definitely recommend this book, and here’s why.

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New book // ‘We Could Be Beautiful’ review!

Today, a book review! This new release (it comes out today) was on my recent summer TBR—by Swan Huntley, here’s my We Could Be Beautiful review.

we could be beautiful reviewWe Could Be Beautiful is about a 44-year-old rich woman named Catherine West. Catherine is all about the luxury and the privilege: she’s got a perfectly immaculate West Village home stocked with fine art, the best furniture, and a whole lot of hired help. She gets $80k a month from her trust fund, has a mother slowly succumbing to Alzheimer’s, and the thing that Catherine wants more than anything is to be married and have a child. Enter William Stockton, an impeccably dressed and well-spoken businessman who meets Catherine at an art gallery. It was love at first sight. Or was it?

Called “psychological,” this book aims to fully portray several characters in all their depth, foibles, and idiosyncrasies. There’s Catherine, who thinks she’s moral and strong, but who is actually petulant, childish, spoiled, privileged, and completely farcical. There’s William Stockton, a man who seems perfect but who is absolutely too good to be true. And then there’s Catherine’s sister Caroline, more honest and self-aware than her sister, and much more aware of her own privilege.
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Book Lust | 2016 book releases to watch for!

Summer, for me, is all about how many books I can read on a beach, on a plane, or even through audiobook on my commute. Even though I’m trying to save money, these are four new 2016 book releases I cannot WAIT to get my hands on. I’ve been in desperate need of new books to read, thanks to a year-long book-buying drought. Breaking the fast now!

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Lit Quote // Know your flaws

To continue in the theme of Pride and Prejudice, I have a lit quote today from that book, the greatest of all books, that distinguishes between pride and vanity. The quote is spoken by Lizzy’s little sister Mary, the pedant who thinks she knows everything and is better than everyone, making this quote kinda ironic.

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It’s ironic because Mary is verrrryyy proud, and Lizzy is both proud and vain! I love Pride and Prejudice for a very many reasons, but one of them is because the two main characters are proud and flawed, and each has to come to terms with their own pride/vanity/what-have-you before they can get together. Title makes sense now, don’t it? 😉

It also reminds me that even though Elizabeth Bennet is one of the best characters in literature ever, she’s still so far from perfect. There’s a lot to learn from a character like that.

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Book Rec // ‘Villette’ by Charlotte Brontë

Next on my to-read list for this year was a Charlotte Brontë novel I’ve been meaning to read since college: Villette. I’m slowly working my way through my classics shelf via my Over Drive app (yay for audiobooks!) and I’m happy to have read this amazing book.

Jane Eyre is the Charlotte Brontë novel most people are familiar with, but this one, Villette, was Charlotte’s last novel and her most autobiographical. Even though it took me forever to read, this classic is a must-read!

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Lit Quote // Do what you love 

Today I have a hashtag Lit Quote for ya! This quote comes from my favorite book (possibly of all time), The Crimson Petal and the White. It’s a book I’ve read a few times, and written about several times. It’s set in Victorian London with an amazing cast of characters, one of which is a talented prostitute named Sugar. She’s one of my favorite characters in literature ever.

But this quote was said by a frankly kind of terrible character, who thinks he’s a poet/intellectual/writer, but in reality is just kind of a blowhard (pardon my French). He says:

the crimson petal and the white

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Book Rec // ‘The Mistletoe and Sword’ by Anya Seton

Anyone who has read this blog before knows I am obsessed with historical fiction. It may be my favorite genre ever, and one that I have been reading since I was in eighth grade. I think that good, accurate historical fiction is the best way to learn history, and is also one of the most entertaining kind of novels because you learn more than you would from textbooks, and anyway, the romantic in me absolutely loves imagining and reading about previous eras. Who doesn’t?

And in keeping with this year’s resolution to shop a whole lot less, read more, and most important, read the books I already have, when I was given a whole, lazy Saturday at home one weekend, I reached into my shelves and drew out a book I bought in 2012, one that I hadn’t ever opened before, and one that is by one of my favorite authors: Anya Seton.

Anya Seton was a successful, bestselling historical fiction novelist in the 1950s, known best for her works Katherine and The Winthrop Woman. But she also wrote a slimmer, young-adult novel named The Mistletoe and Sword. At 250 pages, this book was the perfect size to devour in a day. Here’s what it’s about.
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Favorite author of the moment // Daphne du Maurier

daphne du maurierMy love for Daphne du Maurier has been a slow burn. In high school, like approximately 97% of us, I read Rebecca and utterly loved it. Then we read “The Birds” in class and I loved that, too. Last year, I read her other short stories in a collection, and those horror-infused short stories still haunt me to this day. Then later on in 2015, I visited a secondhand bookstore in the city and bought three of her novels: Frenchman’s Creek, Jamaica Inn, and The House on the Strand. I absolutely adored Frenchman’s Creek, her romance novel with themes of female freedom, and now I am looking forward to reading the highly-esteemed Jamaica Inn. Daphne du Maurier is my favorite author of the moment, and here’s why you should definitely put her books on your TBR.
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